Let Canada-Hunts guide you to one of Ontario's hunting guides or outfitters and plan your next incredible hunting adventure on one of Ontario's unique and incredible hunts. Experience Incredible Trophy Hunting in Ontario’s Wilderness using Rifle, Archery / Bow. Unique hunts in one of the finest habitats of North America.

The first things you may need are the regulations and links

icon download British Columbia LinkA link to the Ontario Outfitter Association

icon download British Columbia LinkOntario's Hunting Regulations

icon download Hunting RegulationHunting zone maps for Ontario

icon downloadTourism Site for Ontario

 

According to Statistics Canada (2015), Ontario has an estimated population of 13,750,073 people (the most of any province) and its capital is Toronto. Ontario covers a geographic area of 908607.67 sq. km. These figures give this province a population density of 15.13 people per sq km. Wikipedea​

Ontario Hunting Zones

Ontario Northern Hunting Zones

Ontario Southeastern Hunting Zones

Ontaior Southwestern Hunting zones

https://www.ontario.ca/travel-and-recreation/find-wildlife-management-unit-wmu-map

Moose

Ontario is home to about 100,000 moose — around 10% of the North American population. 

The moose population has been deemed to be in sever decline and the ministry has made a lot of new changes to try to correct the situtation.

In doing so it has divided the province into Cervid Ecological zones for moose and deer Management.

Cervid Ecological Zone A

Woodland caribou, with low densities of moose and white-tailed deer, live in this zone. For both moose and white-tailed deer, the goal is to maintain low densities through population and habitat management.

Ontario Cervid Ecological Zone A

The ministry has posted numbers and expectations for this cervid unit. I have not listed each hunting zone but you may view them at:

https://www.ontario.ca/page/moose-population-management

In a nut shell, The moose population is 22,642, the lower expectation by the year 2030 is desired to be 15,100, and the upper expectiation by the year 2030 is desired to be 28,550.

Cervid Ecological Zone B

Moose, white-tailed deer and woodland caribou live in this zone. For moose, the goal is to maintain a low to moderate density population.

Ontario Cervid Zone B

The ministry has posted numbers and expectations for this cervid unit. I have not listed each hunting zone but you may view them at:

https://www.ontario.ca/page/moose-population-management

In a nut shell, The moose population is 26,019, the lower expectation by the year 2030 is desired to be 21,850, and the upper expectiation by the year 2030 is desired to be 29,850.

Cervid Ecological Zone C1

Moose and white-tailed deer are the main cervid species in this zone, but there may also be small numbers of elk and woodland caribou. For moose, the goal is to maintain a moderate to high density population.

Ontario Cervid Zone C1

The ministry has posted numbers and expectations for this cervid unit. I have not listed each hunting zone but you may view them at:

https://www.ontario.ca/page/moose-population-management

In a nut shell, The moose population is 10,856, the lower expectation by the year 2030 is desired to be 12,650, and the upper expectiation by the year 2030 is desired to be 17,250.

Cervid Ecological Zone C2

Moose and white-tailed deer are the main cervid species in this zone, but there may also be small numbers of elk and woodland caribou. For moose, the goal is to maintain a moderate to high density population.

Ontario Cerivid Zone C2

The ministry has posted numbers and expectations for this cervid unit. I have not listed each hunting zone but you may view them at:

https://www.ontario.ca/page/moose-population-management

In a nut shell, The moose population is 13,948, the lower expectation by the year 2030 is desired to be 17,400, and the upper expectiation by the year 2030 is desired to be 23,600.

Cervid Ecological Zone D1

Moose, white-tailed deer and elk live in this zone. For moose, the goal is to maintain a moderate to high density population.

Ontario Cervid Zone D1

The ministry has posted numbers and expectations for this cervid unit. I have not listed each hunting zone but you may view them at:

https://www.ontario.ca/page/moose-population-management

In a nut shell, The moose population is 1,557, the lower expectation by the year 2030 is desired to be 2,225, and the upper expectiation by the year 2030 is desired to be 4,550.

Cervid Ecological Zone D2

Moose, white-tailed deer and elk live in this zone. For moose, the goal is to maintain a moderate to high density population.

Ontario Cervid Zone D2

The ministry has posted numbers and expectations for this cervid unit. I have not listed each hunting zone but you may view them at:

https://www.ontario.ca/page/moose-population-management

In a nut shell, The moose population is 11,163, the lower expectation by the year 2030 is desired to be 9,150, and the upper expectiation by the year 2030 is desired to be 16,800.

Cervid Ecological Zone E1, E2 and E3

White-tailed deer is the main cervid species living in this zone, but there are also small numbers of moose and elk. Moose are managed for low population densities in some parts of the zone.

Ontario Cervid zone E1 E2 E3

The ministry has posted numbers and expectations for this cervid unit. It consists of only one WMW, #65. Source:

https://www.ontario.ca/page/moose-population-management

The moose population is 141, the lower expectation by the year 2030 is desired to be 75, and the upper expectiation by the year 2030 is desired to be 150.

Cervid Ecological Zone Totals

The total moose population of Ontario is 86,326 Moose.

The ministry expects to have reached its lower expectation of 78,450 moose by the year 2030.

And possibly its the upper expectiation of 120,750 moose by the year 2030.

Black Bear

Ontario’s black bear population is estimated at 85,000 to 105,000 bears – the second largest in North America.  They are found in forested areas throughout most of Ontario, including a very small population in the northern part of southwestern Ontario as habitat slowly improves.

Ontario Black Bear Gene Pool

Genetic clusters of american black bears in southeastern Ontario, Canada, 2012. There are three main genetic clusters differentiated by three colours: Northwest (blue), Southeast (green), Bruce Peninsula (red). Source: Pelletier et al., 2012.

Elk

Elk are a recent re-addition to the natural biodiversity of Ontario.  In the late 1800s, elk were eradicated in Ontario due to overhunting and habitat loss. From 1999-2001, the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry worked with a number of local and provincial partners to reintroduce elk to four separate locations across the province. These efforts were successful and elk have returned to their place as an important part of Ontario's ecosystems and biodiversity.

Moose

Source: https://www.ontario.ca/page/factors-affect-moose-survival

In Ontario, biologist Brad Allison with the Ministry of Natural Resources reports that moose numbers are declining in the northwest and northeast and actually increasing in the south, particularly in the Algonquin Park area. On a provincial scale, the moose population is stable at about 105,000,  [4-2013] Editor's Note: Using Ministry Numbers I estimate this population to be about 86,000 moose.

White-Tailed Deer

White-tailed deer are the most common and widely distributed large mammal in North America.  In Ontario, they are the most numerous of the province’s 4 deer species (white-tailed deer, moose, woodland caribou, and American elk), with a population of approximately 400,000.

White-tailed deer in Ontario are larger than most of their counterparts in the US in order to weather the chilly climate, so antler size is comparably vast. While most white-tailed bucks average 140 to 250 pounds (63 to 114 k), Ontario bucks can top 300 pounds (136 kg).

You can track or drive white-tailed deer through farm country or through big forest. Farm-country hunters concentrate on woodlots and creek bottoms near agricultural fields.

Most hunt from tree stands or ground blinds near trails, rubs, scrapes, feeding areas, or by using drives to push deer to waiting stands. Big-woods hunters use these same techniques in deer funnels and logging cuts, but also incorporate still-hunting and tracking.

WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW

  • Ontario’s deer herds are managed through a selective harvest system.
  • During the gun season, opportunities to hunt antlerless (does and fawns) white-tailed deer are regulated, while buck hunting remains open. At other times, the overall number of white-tailed deer tags available to hunters will vary, depending on the carefully monitored population levels.
  • There is no open season for hunting caribou in the province. Elk hunting is only by draw for tags.
  • As with any game in Ontario, you should be aware of the seasons and hunting licences required.
  • Hunters orange must be worn during open gun seasons for both white-tailed deer and moose.
  • In some WMUs, non-resident hunters must hunt through an outfitter.

References

  •  https://www.ontario.ca/page/wildlife-management
  •  https://www.ontariotravel.net/en/play/hunting/hunting-species/white-tailed-deer
  •  https://www.ontario.ca/page/moose-population-management
  •  http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/ottawa/us-moose-decline-not-mirrored-in-ontario-or-quebec-1.2055639
  •  https://www.ontario.ca/page/factors-affect-moose-survival
  •  https://www.cbd.int/doc/world/ca/ca-nr-05-en.pdf
Photo Credit for Background

Justin Stevens - Flickr

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