Let Canada-Hunts guide you to one of Nova Scotia's hunting guides or outfitters and plan your next incredible hunting adventure on one of Nova Scotia's unique and incredible hunts. Experience Incredible Trophy Hunting in Nova Scotia’s Wilderness using Rifle, Archery / Bow. Unique hunts in one of the finest habitats of North America.

The first things you may need are the regulations and links

icon download British Columbia LinkA link to the Nova Scotia Outfitter Association

icon download British Columbia LinkNova Scotia's Hunting Regulations (look under Laws and Regulations)

icon download Hunting RegulationHunting zone maps for Nova Scotia (Look under Laws and Regulations)

icon downloadTourism Site for Nova Scotia

 

According to Statistics Canada (2015), Nova Scotia has an estimated population of 942,926 people and its capital is Halifax. Nova Scotia and is the second-smallest province in Canada covering a geographic area of 52,939.44 square kilometres. The population density of this province works out to be 17.81 people per sq km. Wikipedea​

Black Bears

I have reports that the black bear population is about 12,000 bears living between the northern tip of Cape Breton and the southern part of mainland Nova Scotia but they are rarely seen. 

The province website reports that black bears live throughout most of the province, but are most common in the five south-western counties

 
Reported Black Bear Harvest by County 
County201520142013201220112010

Annapolis

25

40

27

37

38

25

Antigonish

22

9

17

11

21

11

Cape Breton

1

3

0

1

2

1

Colchester

32

21

34

10

38

19

Cumberland

38

45

57

40

46

51

Digby

9

13

20

18

20

36

Guysborough

14

11

10

6

14

7

Halifax

27

30

33

15

20

24

Hants

18

11

18

16

13

18

Inverness

4

8

5

7

15

10

Kings

21

15

15

15

28

13

Lunenburg

14

20

22

18

18

18

Pictou

36

12

25

10

18

14

Queens

18

23

19

8

17

13

Richmond

1

0

0

0

0

0

Shelburne

5

13

14

11

5

5

Victoria

4

5

6

2

5

5

Yarmouth

5

14

9

10

20

12

Total

284

293

331

235

338

282

 

Source of Data: http://novascotia.ca/natr/hunt/bear-stats.asp

Year

% of reported harvested bears 12 years or older

2009

9.3

2010

5.3

2011

3.6

2012

6.8

2013

4.6

2014

6.9

Source of Data: http://novascotia.ca/natr/hunt/bear-stats.asp

Moose

The Cape Breton Island population currently numbers about 5,000 animals. The mainland moose population is estimated at 1,000 animals or less.

There is no moose season on the mainland of Nova Scotia

Nova Scotia's Moose Hunting Zones

Map Source: http://novascotia.ca/natr/hunt/pdf/Hunting_Summary_2016.pdf

Refer to the hunting regulation's page 72 for description of hunting zones.

In the 1970s, a large spruce budworm outbreak killed much of the boreal forest of Cape Breton Highlands National Park. The regeneration of balsam fir and white birch following the budworm outbreak provided large volumes of food for the moose. With an abundance of food and lack of predators, the moose population grew quickly. In 2011, it was estimated that there were two moose per square kilometer in Cape Breton Highlands National Park.

Cape Breton Island went through a recent Moose Population Reduction. The moose harvest achieved its goal of a 90% reduction of moose within this small area for the year 2015 —which is less than 2% of the park. A total of 37 moose were harvested over 13 days, ending on December 14, 2015.

2015's harvest will help inform Parks Canada’s on-going efforts to restore the health of Cape Breton Highlands National Park. The current moose population in Cape Breton Highlands National Park is unsustainable. This conclusion was reached after 15 years of scientific study and a more recent investigation in 2015 that estimated the density of moose is 1.9 moose/km2. A healthy, balanced forest typically supports 0.5 moose/km2. If the conditions remain the same, the ecosystem will not be sustainable for current and future generations. This is why Parks Canada is taking concrete actions to help restore and maintain forest health in Cape Breton Highlands National Park.  

Moose are rare on mainland Nova Scotia, so why don't we move some of the Cape Breton moose to the mainland?

The moose in Cape Breton are a different subspecies of moose than those found on the mainland. Cape Breton moose are all descendants of 18 moose reintroduced from Alberta in the late 1940s, and are genetically different from the Eastern moose subspecies found on the mainland. While moving Cape Breton moose to the mainland would be one option, Provincial wildlife managers would likely prefer to reintroduce moose from New Brunswick or Quebec rather than from Cape Breton. These moose are the same subspecies and would ensure that the unique genetic make up of Nova Scotia moose would be better preserved.

Whitetailed Deer

Nova Scotia's Whitetail Management Areas

Map Source: http://novascotia.ca/natr/hunt/deer-stats.asp

Deer Harvest by County 2005 - 2015
 

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Annapolis

370

489

542

551

490

472

426

367

604

611

378

Antigonish

227

287

304

396

206

237

204

291

244

261

163

Cape Breton

54

112

147

157

126

95

121

92

172

156

85

Colchester

799

1,143

1,126

1,454

963

1,087

1,114

1,131

1,274

1,225

1,033

Cumberland

568

780

927

1,053

649

683

592

662

691

861

383

Digby

228

323

411

433

456

346

305

376

540

547

282

Guysborough

267

376

352

373

247

265

278

325

418

395

337

Halifax

456

658

657

691

546

616

578

648

868

880

677

Hants

628

861

956

1244

861

987

983

1,052

1,179

1,113

751

Inverness

21

67

83

79

48

55

41

58

75

60

46

Kings

301

445

495

404

343

381

359

397

402

374

252

Lunenburg

1,676

1,876

1,923

3,248

3,104

2,505

2,314

1,561

1,791

1,771

1,289

Pictou

472

675

698

855

583

572

511

619

705

866

599

Queens

335

435

359

572

559

536

464

406

536

505

391

Richmond

22

124

120

146

124

96

103

120

156

157

136

Shelburne

300

338

355

415

406

401

337

332

428

439

428

Victoria

10

24

23

26

17

18

9

25

37

26

7

Yarmouth

370

427

561

397

546

504

265

466

569

637

529

Unknown

49

51

36

74

59

404

160

109

146

95

58

Total Harvest

7,151

9,491

10,075

12,568

10,333

10,280

9,164

9,037

10,835

10,979

7,824

Total License Sales

38,798

38,973

39,193

41,150

40,025

38,310

39,322

35,732

45,007

40,686

38,875

Hunter Success (%)

18.6

24.3

25.7

30.5

25.8

26.8

23.3

25.3

24.1

26.9

20.1

Source of Data: http://novascotia.ca/natr/hunt/deer-stats.asp

References
  • Parks Canada - http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/ns/cbreton/plan/foret-forest/declaration-statement.aspx
  • Parks Canada - http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/pn-np/ns/cbreton/natcul/natcul1/c/i/b.aspx
  • http://novascotia.ca/natr/wildlife/sustainable/mmoosefaq.asp#mm1
  • http://www.novascotia.ca/natr/wildlife/nuisance/whenbearsban.pdf
Photo Credit for Background

Wallace Howe - Kejimkujik - Flickr

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