Let Canada-Hunts guide you to one of Newfoundland Labrador's hunting guides or outfitters and plan your next incredible hunting adventure on one of Newfoundland Labrador's unique and incredible hunts. Experience Incredible Trophy Hunting in Newfoundland Labrador’s Wilderness using Rifle, Archery / Bow. Unique hunts in one of the finest habitats of North America.

The first things you may need are the regulations and links

icon download British Columbia LinkA link to the Newfoundland Labrador Outfitter Association

icon download British Columbia LinkNewfoundland Labrador's Hunting  Licenses & Regulations, hunting zone maps.

icon downloadTourism Site for Newfoundland Labrador

 

According to Statistics Canada (2015), New Foundland and Labrador has an estimated population of 525,756 people and their capital is that of St. Johns. Newfoundland and its associated small islands have a total area of 111,390 square kilometres (43,008 sq mi) to give this lightly densilated province a density of 1.42 people per sq km.Wikipedea​

Black Bear

Newfoundland’s black bears (Ursus americanus hamiltoni) have been designated as a distinct subspecies. This designation acknowledges differences in head shape and size, genetic diversity, and a larger-than-average body size compared to other black bears throughout North America. Black bears are found throughout the Island of Newfoundland, but only occasionally on the Avalon and southern Burin Peninsulas. In Labrador, black bears range from the southern border as far north as the Nakvak Fiord

Labrador_Black_Bear_Management_Areas

Map From: https://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/55067/55067E.pdf

There are three black Bear Management Areas in Labrador (Figure 10.3.5‐4): (i) the Torngat Mountains; (ii) George River and the Labrador South; and (iii) the transmission corridor only passes through the Labrador 25 South Bear Management Area (Figure 10.3.5‐4). Bear Management Areas on the Island of Newfoundland are the same as those for moose (Figure 10.3.5‐3), and the Project intersects 21 of them (Figure 10.3.5‐3). The hunting quota for resident and non‐residents is two bears (either sex) in all open management areas (GNL 2009).There are three black Bear Management Areas in Labrador (Figure 10.3.5‐4): (i) the Torngat Mountains; (ii) George River and the Labrador South; and (iii) the transmission corridor only passes through the Labrador 25 South Bear Management Area (Figure 10.3.5‐4). Bear Management Areas on the Island of Newfoundland are the same as those for moose (Figure 10.3.5‐3), and the Project intersects 21 of them (Figure 10.3.5‐3). The hunting quota for resident and non‐residents is two bears (either sex) in all open management areas (GNL 2009).

Black bear are known to be distributed throughout the Study Area in Labrador. The black bear baseline study 30 in support of the Lower Churchill Hydroelectric Generation Project from 2006 to 2009 provides the most comprehensive overview of this species in the region (Stantec 2010d) and indicated that black bear are relatively common in central Labrador. Recurrent use of the river valley was evident, although the home range of bears extended beyond the lower Churchill River watershed (particularly in association with the landfill in Happy Valley‐Goose Bay) (Stantec 2010d). Although the black bear is noted as present within Southeastern 35 Labrador, no detailed data pertaining to its distribution or use in the Study Area could be found.

Newfoundland moose and bear management units

Map from: https://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/55067/55067E.pdf

Black bear are found throughout the Island of Newfoundland, although relatively few published studies of black bear are available and of those that are, most focus on morphology and / or genetic distinctions between black bears on the Island compared to other areas in North America

The black bear is the largest land carnivore in Newfoundland, and the second largest in Labrador, where polar bears are found. Black bears range in size up to 275 kg or 600 lb; males generally range from 90-140 kg (200-300 lb). Females range from 50-90 kg (110-180 lb) and rarely exceed 100 kg (225 lb). Bear sizes and weights vary widely depending on regional differences in habitat quality

 

Caribou

Caribou in Labrador DistributionWoodland caribou are distributed throughout the boreal forest of Labrador in open conifer-lichen forests containing numerous water bodies and tundra/low shrub vegetation at higher levels. Three local populations have been identified, each with an affinity to a particular location during calving. Population Trends The Red Wine Mountain population has declined from 700 caribou in the 1980s to <100 caribou currently. The Lac Joseph and Mealy Mountain populations declined in the 1970s/80s and have recently been estimated to contain 1400 and 2100 caribou, respectively.

The Woodland caribou is now a protected species and a hunting ban on the George River Herd was imposed in 2013.

Caribou on the island of Newfound have declined from a peak of about 94,000 animals in the late 1990s to approximately 32,000 in 2013, because there were too many animals and too little food. The island is still maintaining a hunt.

 Caribou Herds of Newfoundland

Map from Species at risk https://www.registrelep-sararegistry.gc.ca/default.asp?lang=En&n=46B86DC7-1&offset=1&toc=show

 

Deer

There is no deer season in Newfoundland or Labrador.

Moose

Labrador Moose Management Areas

 

Map From: https://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/55067/55067E.pdf

Newfoundland moose and bear management units

Map From: https://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/55067/55067E.pdf

Weighing up to 1,200 pounds, some with 50-inch spreads, there are approximately 120,000 moose on the island  one of the highes concentrations in Canada. Rifle hunters can enjoy an established 85% success rate..Both bow and muzzleloader hunting is permitted.

For 2016-17, 950 licences are available in Gros Morne National Park as well as additional not-for-profit licences. Licences for Gros Morne National Park will be issued through the existing provincial draw system. If you are interested in helping Parks Canada with the moose reduction program, please fill out your application for the provincial moose licence as normal, indicating your preference for Moose Management Area 2E (Gros Morne National Park).

Newfoundland Hunting zone 2E

Map From: http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/progs/np-pn/sf-fh/grosmorne/guide.aspx

There is a single MMA for Gros Morne National Park that will be divided into four zones. Your Gros Morne MMA licence and tags are valid in all zones:

  • Zone 1 (September 10, 2016 to February 5, 2017). This zone includes backcountry area only that is greater than 2 km from park highways. There is no road access in Zone 1. This area is accessible by boat or aircraft.
  • Zone 2 (October 11, 2016 to February 5, 2017). This zone includes the majority of the remainder of the national park and is accessible by road, boat, or aircraft.
  • Zone 3 (November 12, 2016 to February 5, 2017).): This zone includes areas that are adjacent to major park trails and that surround Killdevil Camp, which is used by school groups until late fall.
  • Zone 4 (NO HUNTING). This zone includes a number of areas adjacent to park trails and infrastructure that are closed to hunting.

Newfoundland Moose Population Estimates

Data From: https://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/55067/55067E.pdf

Polar Bears

Distribution of Polar Bear in LabradorPolar bears found are found along the coast of Labrador. They are most often found on sea ice, visiting land for only short periods; however, they may be forced onto land for several or more months when sea ice is unavailable. They occasionally visit the island of Newfoundland on spring ice, but will move north again. Population Trends Polar bears found in Newfoundland and Labrador are part of the Davis Strait sub-population. The exact numbers of polar bears that inhabit the Labrador coastline are unknown but may number in the hundreds. The total Canadian population is about 15 000 bears.

References

  • http://www.env.gov.nl.ca/env/publications/wildlife/BlackBearBiology_Management.pdf
  • http://www.env.gov.nl.ca/env/wildlife/endangeredspecies/woodland_caribou.pdf 
  • http://www.env.gov.nl.ca/env/wildlife/endangeredspecies/polar_bear.pdf
  • http://www.pc.gc.ca/eng/progs/np-pn/sf-fh/grosmorne/guide.aspx
  • https://www.ceaa-acee.gc.ca/050/documents/55067/55067E.pdf
Photo Credit for Background

Maciej - Bottle Cove at Sunset - Flickr

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