Let Canada-Hunts guide you to one of British Columbia's hunting guides or outfitters and plan your next incredible hunting adventure on one of British Columbia's unique and incredible hunts.

The first things you may need are the regulations and links

icon download British Columbia LinkA link to the British Columbia Outfitter Association

icon download Hunting RegulationHunting Regulations for British Columbia

icon download Hunting GuideHunting zone maps for British Columbia

icon downloadTourism Site for British Columbia

 

British Columbia Hunting Zones

 

According to Statistics Canada (2015), British Columbia has an estimated population of 4,666,892 people and its capital is Victoria. British Columbia has Canada's 3rd largest population and a land area of 922,509.29 square kilometres giving it a population density of 5.06 people per sq km.  

This province has 8 hunting zones with #7 split into two areas yielding a total of 9 hunting zones. And those zones are broken down further into hunting units. (Links are provided to the government site to view these maps and to download higher density maps of the areas.)
 
All non-resident hunters wishing to hunt big game in the Province of British Columbia are required to be accompanied by a registered guide outfitter or by a resident who holds an Accompany to Hunt Permit.
 
Big game includes:

Whitetail and Mule Deer, Elk, Moose, Caribou, Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Cougar, Lynx, Bobcat, Wolf, Grizzly Bear, Black Bear, and Wolverine 

Small game includes:
Game birds, Fox, Coyote, Raccoon, Skunk, and Hare. 
Note that some hunting trophies have harvest fees in addition to the hunting tag that you have purchased payable upon harvesting your trophy.
For more information  contact FrontCounerBC at:
www. FrontCounterBC.gov.bc.ca
or by phone at 1-877-855-3222 

Region 1 - Vancouver Island

British Columbia Vancouver Island Hunting District

Black Tailed Deer

Black tail deer are plentiful in Region 1 Vancouver island Distrist. 

BC_Roosevelt Elk
Of the approximately 3200 Roosevelt elk that inhabit British Columbia, over 3000 of those live exclusively on Vancouver Island where population densities in some areas can reach up to six per square km.

Source: http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/wld/documents/elk.pdf

One of unique features of a Region 1 Vancouver Island hunt would be to hunt for a Vancouver Island Black Bear (Ursus americanus vancouveri) which has evolved due to its separation from the mainland.

These bears are all black with no color phases and about half will have a white patch on their chest.

The Canadian cougar population is estimated to be 4,000 animals of which 3,000 of those reside in British Columbia and there are an increasing number of cougar sightings noted by the press. Of BC’s 3000 cougars, 25% of those occupy Region 1Vancouver Island giving it have the highest population of cougar in the world.

Mountain Goats

Region 1 Vacouver Island - 1,500-2,600

Mountain Goats are distribuited faily evenly throughout BC with the notable exceptions being Okanagan having only 200 – 300 and Skena baving the most at 15,000-35,000.

It is no secret to hunters that harvesting female mountain goats is detrimental to the survival of the mountain goat. For this reason, quotas on female mountain goats was reduced and in some cases closed (but not to males) by the Province in order to sustain the population. A proposed change in regulations was "There is no open season for a female mountain goat accompanying a kid, or a female mountain goat in a group that contains one or more kids."

Wolf

Another unique species of the island is the Vancouver Island wolf (Canis lupus crassodon) which is a subspecies of the Grey Wolf.

Vancouver Island Marmot

An endangered species is the Vancouver Island marmot (Marmota vancouverensis) that occurs only in the high mountains of Vancouver Island. This particular marmot species is large compared to some other marmots, and most other rodents and is protected.

Region 2 Lower Mainland Hunting District

British Columbia Lower Mainland Hunting District

Black Tailed Deer

There are around 17,000-29,000 estimated black-tailed deer in the Region 2 Lower Mainland district  and is the most common big game in this region.

Black Bear

There is an estimated number of 5,00 Black bears in this region and the second most popular big game quarry within the region in terms of hunter interest and hunter effort.

The black bear is successful here because they are dormant during the winter months, and therefore not dependent upon the availability of suitable winter range for survival. They  are most attracted to forested areas where the vegetation has recently been altered, by either natural or artificial means, (ie. slides, natural burns, logging).

Cougar

The Canadian cougar population is estimated to be 4,000 animals of which 3,000 of those reside in British Columbia and there are an increasing number of cougar sightings noted by the press. Of BC's 3000 cougars, 2400 of those occupy the mainland of British Columbia.

Cougar populations  are viable and occur in every management unit in Region 2 except MU 2-4, where the species occurs only rarely. Regional hunting efforts are concentrated in MU's 2-2, 2-3 and the southern parts of 2-8, 2-9 and 2-10. Hunting effort in the remainder of the region is minimal.

Bobcat

The Bobcat occurs throughout all of the Lower Mainland Region, with the largest populations occurring in the northern and south-eastern portions of the region. The current population estimates for the region is 600 animals and it is managed primarily as a game animal in MU's 2-2, 2-3 and the southern parks of 2-9 and 2-10. 

Region 3 Thompson Nicola Hunting District

British Columbia Thompson Hunting District

  

Region 4 Kootenay Hunting District

British Columbia Kootany Hunting District

Region 5 Cariboo Hunting District

British Columbia Cariboo Hunting District

Region 6 Skeena Hunting District

British Columbia Skeena Hunting District

 

Region 7A Omineca Hunting District

British Columbia Omineca Hunting District

 

Region 7B Peace Hunting District

British Columbia Peace Hunting District

 

Region 8 Okanagan Hunting District

British Columbia Okanagan Hunting District

 

British Columbia Hunting in General

Bighorn Sheep

Big Horn Sheep in BC

 

This species is going through some troubled times right now. An article from the Vancouver Sun 2015 cites a mange that is attacking the Sheep population and reports a 50% decrease. I would look for significant changes here.

Thin Horn Sheep

British Columbia Thin Horned Sheep Distribution

Distribution map shows that Regions 6, 7A and 7B are your best choice here.

Black Bear

British Columbia Black Bear
In British Columbia, aside from urban areas  black bears inhabit all areas of the province however they appear to have higher populations along the west coast and in some southern regions. (Refer to the map on the British Columbia main page). 

British Columbia has a high variation in colour phases including cinnamon, brown, and blonde. A white-coloured morph, called Kermode or Spirit Bear, is reported most frequently on the north-central coast and a blue phase, or glacier bear, is sometimes seen in the extreme northwest corner of the province.

Grizzly Bear

British Columbia Grizzly Bear
Bear Populations appear to be actually on the rise and the province in 2014 started a program of opening previously closed Management units and increased its total tag allocation for the year much to the dismay of the Raincoast Conservation Foundation.

 

British Columbia Ungulate Species Regional Population Estimates and Status - Preseason 2014
Region
 
Region 1 Vacouver Island
Region 2 Lower Mainland  
Region 3 Thompson
Region 4 Kootenay
Region 5 Cariboo
Region 6 Skeena
Region 7A Omineca
Region 7B Peace
€‹Region 8 Okanagan
  Black Tailed Deer  
 
44,000-65,000
17,000-29,000
1,000-2,000
0
1,000-6,000
35,000-55,000
0
0
0
Mule Deer
 
0
3,000-5,000
35,000-55,000
10,000-20,000
15,000-30,000
2,000-3,000
3,000-6,000
4,000-7,000
28,000-42,000
  Whitetail Deer  
 
0
20-50
6,500-9,000
38,000-62,000
15,000-30,000
500-1,000
500-1,000
4,000-10,000
31,000-44,000
      Caribou      
 
0
0
120-140
270-290
1,800-2,100
9,000-12,000
1,900-2,100
3,500-4,300
5 -15
 
 
Region
 
Region 1 Vacouver Island
Region 2 Lower Mainland
Region 3 Thompson
Region 4 Kootenay
Region 5 Cariboo
Region 6 Skeena
Region 7A Omineca
Region 7B Peace
€‹Region 8 Okanagan
 
 
Elk
 
4,800-5,800
1300-1500
200-300
15,000-24,000
200-400
200-500
€‹500-2,000
15,000-35,000
2,500 -3.500
 
 
Moose
 
10-20
75-150
8,000-10,000
4,000-7,000
15,000-23,000
25,000-45,000
15,000-35,000
50,000 -60,000
3,500-4,500
 
 
Bison
 
0
0
0
0
0
5-10
0
1,300-2,000
0
 
 
Region
 
Region 1 Vacouver Island
Region 2 Lower Mainland
Region 3 Thompson
Region 4 Kootenay
Region 5 Cariboo
Region 6 Skeena
Region 7A Omineca
Region 7B Peace
€‹Region 8 Okanagan
 
 
Mountain Goat
 
1,500-2,600
1,500-2,300
1,550-1,750
7,200-7,900
4,000-5,000
15,000-35,000
3,000-4,000
3,000-5,000
200-300
 
 
Thin Horn Sheep  
 
0
0
0
0
0
4,000-6,500
600-900
6,000-9,000
0
 
 
Bighorn Sheep
 
0
0
2,500-2,700
2,100-2,300
500-800
0
0
60-130
500-1,200

http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/fw/wildlife/management-issues/docs/2014_Provincial%20Ungulate%20Numbers%20Oct%2030_Final.pdf

Caribou

British Columbia Caribou Distribution



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Region 5 Cariboo - 1,800 to 2,100
  • Region 6 Skeena - 6,000 to 12,000
  • Region 7A Omineca - 1,900 to 2,100
  • Region 7B Peace - 3,500 to 4,300

All Caribou in British Columbia (B.C.) belong to the woodland subspecies (Rangifer tarandus caribou). Of B.C.'s estimated 20,700 Woodland Caribou, approximately 1300 are Boreal Caribou, 1700 Mountain Caribou, and 17,700 Northern Caribou (Ministry of Environment, March 2010, unpubl. data).

Elk

In many areas of the province, elk populations are increasing and expanding their range for a variety of reasons.

Mountain Goats

Mountain Goats are distribuited faily evenly throughout BC with the notable exceptions being Okanagan having only 200 - 300 and Skena baving the most at 15,000 - 35,000 . Kootenay may not have the most but it is a much smaller district and may well have a higher population density.

Conservation Officer Service District Offices

Vancouver Island Hunting District

Campbell River

  • 1-250-289-7630

Duncan

  • 1-250-746-1236

Nanaimo

  • 1-250-751-3190

Port Alberni

  • 1-250-724-9290

Port McNeil

  • 1-250-965-5000

Victoria

  • 1-250-391-2225

Lower Mainland Hunting District

Cultus Lake

Maple Ridge

Powell River

  • 1-800-731-6373

Sechelt

Squamish

Surrey

  • 1-800-731-6373

Thompson Hunting District

Clear Water

  • 1-250-674-3722

Kamloops

  • 1-250-371-6281

Lilooet

  • 1-250-256-4636

Merritt

  • 1-250-378-8489

Kootenay Hunting District

Castlegar

  • 1-877-333-8537

Cranbrook

  • 1-877-333-8537

Creston

  • 1-877-333-8537

Fernie

  • 1-877-333-8537

Invermere

  • 1-250-342-4266

Nelson

  • 1-877-333-8537

Golden

  • 1-877-333-8537

Cariboo Hunting District

Bella Coola

  • 1-250-982-2421

Quesnel

  • 1-250-992-4212

100 Mile House

  • 1-250-395-5511

Williams Lake

  • 1-250-398 4569

Skeena Hunting District

Atlin

  • 1-250-651-7501

Burns Lake

  • 1-250-692-7777

Dease Lake

  • 1-250-771-3566

Queen Charlotte City

  • 1-250-559-8431

Smithers 

  • 1-250-847-7266

Terrace 

  • 1-250-638-6530

Omineca Hunting District

Mackenzie

  • 1-250-997-6555

Prince George

  • 1-250-565-6140

Vanderhoof

  • 1-250-567-6304

Okanagan Hunting District

Grand Forks

  • 1-877-356-2029

Kelowna

  • 1-877-356-2029

Penticton

  • 1-877-356-2029

Vernon

  • 1-877-356-2029

Peace Hunting District

Chetwynd

  • 1-250-788-3611

Dawson Creek

  • 1-250-784-2304

Fort Nelson

  • 1-250-774-3547

Fort St. John

  • 1-250-787-3255

You are requested to call one of the numbers above for a recorded message or to make an appointment: 

Photo Credit for Background
  • Flickr
Article Credits
  • Map of BC Hunting Zones - Canada-Hunts.ca
  • Map for Roosevelt Elk - http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/wld/documents/elk.pdf

 

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